The Loveless Church – Ephesus

This week, we’re studying the letter to the first church of Ephesus as found in Revelation 2:2-7. As many know, the seven churches were located in seven prominent cities in the First Century Mediterranean area. Jesus sends a personal letter to each of these churches, giving them counsel, encouragement, and, in most cases, words of warning as well. The sequence of the churches actually follows the route that a mail carrier would have followed in the ancient Asia Minor world. The church of Ephesus is the first addressee on the list.

seven_churchesEphesus is a church that is doing a lot of things right. They patiently continue a work of ministry and outreach in the midst of difficult circumstances, and, perhaps most importantly, they “do not tolerate those who are evil.” More specifically, Jesus affirms the church for hating the “deeds of the Nicolaitans,” whose works Jesus also hates. We don’t know a lot about the Nicolaitans but it seems that they were a sect steeped in the heresy of Gnostiscm or “dualism.” Gnosticism was a philosophical/religious thought that purported that man’s nature was composed of two parts: the spirit (which is good) and the flesh (which is evil). Because the flesh was evil, they argued, then it didn’t matter what you did with it. You could live however you wanted in whatever kind of licentious lifestyle you fancied. There was no need to obey God’s law “in the flesh.” In his letter of 1 John, the Beloved Disciple of course argues vehemently against this kind of heretical thought: “If someone claims, ‘I know God,’ but doesn’t obey God’s commandments, that person is a liar and is not living in the truth” (1 John 2:4, NLT). The church of Ephesus, then, has taken a bold stand against this satanic lie and has maintained its spiritual and doctrinal integrity, something which Jesus praises the church for.

But in spite of all the things that this church is doing right, they are also missing something very, very important. Christ warns, “Remember therefore from where you have fallen; repent and do the first works, or else I will come to you quickly and remove your lampstand from its place-unless you repent” (Revelation 2:5). Whoa! Jesus means business here. Somewhere along the way, this church has missed out on the “love factor” – they’ve forgotten about the relationship! As a result, none of the correct doctrines, none of the “good works” matter one iota! Jesus is basically saying, “If you can’t bring the gospel message of love back into the picture, if you can’t restore the joy and intimacy of a personal relationship with Me, then it would actually be better if you didn’t even exist as a church!” Ephesus is a church that has forgotten its true identity and purpose – to share the love of Christ with each other and with the community in which they live. But, fortunately, Jesus provides the solution: “Repent! Go back to the starting point of repentance and forgiveness. Go back to before you were so arrogant in your ‘good works’ and self-satisfied with your ‘monopoly on the truth.’ Go back to the foot of the Cross.

I am reminded today of that first work of repentance as well as the eternal truth of Love and its calling on my life. How sad to think that this church could work so hard and so diligently protect its spiritual integrity and yet miss out on the most important truth of all! I think this paraphrase of 1 Corinthians 13:1-3 from The Message aptly sums everything up:

If I speak with human eloquence and angelic ecstasy but don’t love, I’m nothing but the creaking of a rusty gate.
If I speak God’s Word with power, revealing all his mysteries and making everything plain as day, and if I have faith that says to a mountain, “Jump,” and it jumps, but I don’t love, I’m nothing.
If I give everything I own to the poor and even go to the stake to be burned as a martyr, but I don’t love, I’ve gotten nowhere. So, no matter what I say, what I believe, and what I do, I’m bankrupt without love.

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