Final Instructions

By Exodus 31, God has been giving instructions to Moses for the last ten chapters – instructions for social laws, ceremonial feast days, the construction of the tabernacle, the garments of the priests, and nearly everything in between. Finally, God wraps up the conversation by telling Moses who has been chosen to build the holy tabernacle:

Then the Lord spoke to Moses, saying: “See, I have called by name Bezalel the son of Uri, the son of Hur, of the tribe of Judah. And I have filled him with the Spirit of God, in wisdom, in understanding, in knowledge, and in all manner of workmanship, to design artistic works, to work in gold, in silver, in bronze, in cutting jewels for setting, in carving wood, and to work in all manner of workmanship.

And I, indeed I, have appointed with him Aholiab the son of Ahisamach, of the tribe of Dan; and I have put wisdom in the hearts of all the gifted artisans, that they may make all that I have commanded you…” (Exodus 31:1-6, NKJV)

I find these words to be of special importance. We so often think of God pouring out His anointing Spirit on pastors, ministers, evangelists, and missionaries. We think of the work of the LORD as encompassing preaching, teaching, and witnessing – but not much else. Yet here we have a beautiful illustration of God’s Spirit being poured out on an ordinary workman. “See, I have called by name Bezalel the son of Uri,” the text reads. “That’s my guy!” God says. “This is the one I have specifically called and chosen to build My holy tabernacle.” What an overwhelming privilege! I would think that this passage offers encouragement and affirmation to those of us who may not have been called to a specific vocation of church ministry. We may not be pastors or foreign missionaries, but, guess what, we’ve still been chosen and anointed to do a very special work of the LORD. You have received a unique calling that only you can fulfill! When you look at it that way, you realize that every single activity of your daily labor—no matter how menial it might seem—can be turned into an act of worship! The New Testament admonishes us to live out this “true worship” which comes by surrendering every facet of lives—whether at work or home or church—to God’s will. “Therefore, I urge you, brothers and sisters, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and pleasing to God—this is your true and proper worship” (Romans 12:1, NIV; see also 1 Corinthians 10:31.) It is both an encouraging realization as well as a sobering mandate of responsibility.

The final set of directions that God gives Moses is in relation to the Sabbath day: “Speak also to the children of Israel, saying: ‘Surely My Sabbaths you shall keep, for it is a sign between Me and you throughout your generations, that you may know that I am the Lord who sanctifies you.’” (Exodus 31:12-13, NKJV). At first I found this repetition of the Sabbath commandment a little strange. Hasn’t God already given clear directions for the Sabbath in Exodus 20? Why the need to repeat? It then occurred to me, however, that the placement of the Sabbath reminder here is indeed very significant. God and Moses have just been talking about all the things that the people will need to do to prepare a dwelling place for the LORD: they will need to build the tabernacle, they will need to craft the sacred furnishings, they will need to prepare the priest’s garments, they will need to perform the dedication ceremony – and the list goes on… Perhaps God wanted to use this last repetition of the Sabbath promise as a way to remind the people that it is not their works, but God’s work, that will make them holy. God wanted His children to take a break every single week on the Sabbath day, to stop and remember – “that you may know that I am the Lord who sanctifies you” (verse 13).

It’s almost as if God has intentionally book-ended this entire mountain-top discourse with the Sabbath. We first read about it in Exodus 20, at the heart of God’s proclamation of the Ten Commandments (the “Ten Promises”). And here we are reading about the beautiful Sabbath promise once again at the end of Exodus 31. I think God wants us to learn something today as well. As we discussed in our previous lesson “The Law, Part 2 – Sabbath,” Sabbath is so much, much more than a mere day of the week. It’s an attitude. We can either live our lives striving to get something that we already have, or we can begin abiding in the promises that God has bestowed upon us. (See John 15:1-8.) The Sabbath signifies a salvational rest. It’s a day we observe every week, where we remember that we can stop working to earn anything with God. We can’t impress Him. We can’t earn our way to heaven. Instead, we simply rest in His self-sacrificing and eternally-lasting love for us.

And with that last reminder, God delivers to Moses His holy law and covenant – the transcript of His very own character of love:

“When the Lord finished speaking with Moses on Mount Sinai, he gave him the two stone tablets inscribed with the terms of the covenant, written by the finger of God” (Exodus 31:18, NLT).

Written with God’s very own finger! The question we are now left with is, “What will Moses and Israel do with this overwhelmingly-beautiful token of God’s covenant relationship?” We wait until the next chapter to find out.

“That I may dwell among them”

“And let them make Me a sanctuary, that I may dwell among them.”
(Exodus 25:8)

When we studied Exodus 24 last time together, we read of the seemingly-insurmountable rift of separation between God and the people. In fact in verses 1-2, God even says, “All of you must worship from a distance. Only Moses is allowed to come near to the Lord. The others must not come near, and none of the other people are allowed to climb up the mountain with him” (Exodus 24:1-2, NLT). The situation seems pretty clear cut. God is holy. The people are not. Therefore, both parties will never be able to exist in each other’s presence. But when we move to Exodus 25, we begin to grasp the amazing realization that God actually had a plan this entire time to close that distance and breach that barrier of separation. Before the fall, mankind enjoyed complete, unhindered fellowship with their Creator. Once the rebellion happened, however, we humans created our own veil of sin separating us from our Heavenly Father. “But your iniquities have separated you from your God; your sins have hidden his face from you, so that he will not hear” (Isaiah 59:2, NKJV). Yet, in Exodus 25-31, with the introduction of the plans for the tabernacle, we begin to see the Father start to close that rift. The amazing reality is that God actually wants to dwell among us. He desires to “move in” with His people.

It is nearly impossible to overemphasize the importance of Exodus 25 verse 8 and how it fits into the comprehensive biblical story. From a literary perspective, this verse acts as a “hinge point” in the scriptural narrative. God will once again make His home among His children. What a mind-blowing prospect! And yet, as we continue to read through Exodus and Leviticus and so on, it doesn’t take us long to realize that there are still some serious limitations with this sanctuary business. God’s Presence among the people is limited to a single physical structure. Additionally, the people must rely on the mediatorial ministry of the priests on their behalf. They are still unable to access God directly. And from God’s perspective, this arrangement simply isn’t good enough.

“And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we beheld His glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father, full of grace and truth” (John 1:14, NKJV). And so, in a breathtaking move that would alter the course of history, God executed the next step in His plan: He sent Jesus Christ to BE the tabernacle among us – the living, breathing manifestation of God. “The Word became flesh and blood, and moved into the neighborhood” (The Message). In three and a half years, Jesus with His little band of followers would change the world. Yet, God’s plan was still not complete. The Person of Jesus Christ, while on earth, was still limited to a single physical place at any given point in time. At the end of His ministry, Jesus must tell His tearful disciples why He would need to go away for a while: “Nevertheless I tell you the truth. It is to your advantage that I go away; for if I do not go away, the Helper will not come to you; but if I depart, I will send Him to you” (John 16:7).

The next step, Jesus instructed His followers, would be for the Holy Spirit to come. A special outpouring of God’s Presence into our lives. And where does that leave us now?

So then you are no longer foreigners and strangers, but fellow citizens with the saints, and members of God’s household, built on the foundation of the apostles and prophets, with Christ Jesus Himself as the cornerstone. The whole building, being put together by Him, grows into a holy sanctuary in the Lord. You also are being built together for God’s dwelling in the Spirit. (Ephesians 2:19-22, HCSB)

Unbelievable as it is, God is now able to become more Present in our lives than was ever imagined possible! You see, God’s Tabernacle among us is no longer limited by physical space. WE are His new tabernacle! “And you are living stones that God is building into his spiritual temple. What’s more, you are his holy priests. Through the mediation of Jesus Christ, you offer spiritual sacrifices that please God.” (1 Peter 2:5, NLT). Through the Holy Spirit’s ministry, God dwells within our very hearts and minds. Our Heavenly Father is completely present, totally engaged in each one of our lives, every moment, every breath of every day. And, in turn, we as the church body are to serve as the vessels of God’s Presence–His Shekinah glory–to the perishing world around us.

And yet, we know this can’t be the end of the story. There’s something still desperately wrong with the reality in which we find ourselves: “And we believers also groan, even though we have the Holy Spirit within us as a foretaste of future glory, for we long for our bodies to be released from sin and suffering…” (Romans 8:23). There now remains just one final step in God’s plan of restoration for His people. It’s the event–the moment–we’re all holding out for with everything we’ve got:

And I heard a loud voice, which came from the throne, say, ‘God’s dwelling place is among men and He will dwell among them and they shall be His peoples. Yes, God Himself will be among them’…

I saw no sanctuary in the city, for the Lord God, the Ruler of all, is its Sanctuary, and so is the Lamb (Revelation 21:3, 22, Weymouth New Testament)

The Lord God Himself will be our sanctuary… No more need for a physical tabernacle structure in this coming City. Because our Heavenly Father is at last able to fully and completely dwell among His people. No more sin, no more suffering, no more separation.

Passover

“Who is the Lord, that I should obey His voice to let Israel go? I do not know the Lord, nor will I let Israel go.” Pharaoh’s defiance has reached its apex, and now God is about to show up on the scene and let Pharaoh know just who the LORD is. Exodus chapters 7 through 10 tell us all about it. In a series of intensifying plagues, God takes each of the Egyptian deities head on to prove His supreme power. Yet, Pharaoh stubbornly persists in his defiant pride. Finally, in Exodus 11, the LORD pronounces the final plague which will succeed in getting Pharaoh’s full attention: throughout all the land of Egypt, each and every firstborn child will die.

But, thank God that we have Exodus chapter 12. In this chapter, God outlines the simple, yet very specific, instructions on taking a lamb without spot or blemish, sacrificing it, and smearing its blood on the doorposts of each home. Every family that follows these instructions exactly will be spared from death. The plague will “pass over” their home.

Interestingly enough, the instructions for the Pesach feast marked the beginning of a brand new year and a new calendar system for the Hebrews (Exodus 12:2). It’s as if God was saying, “Remember all those years in slavery? Well, you can forget them now! We’re wiping the slate and starting over again from scratch.” As G. Campbell Morgan puts it, “God is ever the God of new beginnings in the history of failure.”

On the tenth day of this new year, each family was to choose a perfect lamb. For the next four days, the family was to take care of that little lamb in the home. The lamb was to be loved and cared for, treated as a part of the family. Can you imagine how difficult it was for the family to then take the cherished pet and slaughter it? This practice was intended to teach how heart-wrenching the sacrifice of Christ, our Passover lamb, would be, as well as the terrible, ugly consequences of sin.

The blood of the lamb was then to be applied to the doorposts of the home. Why the doorposts, I wonder? Maybe it’s because doorposts represent the every-day activities of our world. The Scripture often speaks of our “coming in and going out” – the daily rhythm of our lives, so to speak. (See Psalm 121:8.) I am reminded then, that when we accept the gift of Jesus, it is something that covers our entire lives. Not one piece of our daily routine can be left out of His all-encompassing sacrifice. Likewise, the Hebrews were instructed to eat every bit of meat of the paschal lamb (Exodus 12:9-10). None of it was to remain to the morning. When we think of the sacrifice of Jesus, we can’t pick and choose what part of Him we want, can we? No, we must take all of Him and accept ALL of His atonement for us. This has profound, course-altering implications for how we live our lives.

I think it’s fascinating that God gave all these instructions and instituted this feast–a party of celebration, really–all BEFORE He ever delivers His children. It takes some faith to celebrate your freedom before liberation actually happens, doesn’t it? In our way of thinking, we would put the deliverance first, and then have a party to celebrate it. But not God – He reminds us that we can have such faith in His Word, that we can begin celebrating even now.

Finally, the scripture goes on to say, “And it came to pass at the end of the four hundred and thirty years–on that very same day–it came to pass that all the armies of the Lord went out from the land of Egypt” (Exodus 12:41). It may have seemed like God was silent those 430 years, just like it may seem like God is silent and distant in our lives during some seasons. Yet we can know with full assurance that God is constantly, ceaselessly working behind the scenes to accomplish his purpose for us with exact and perfect precision.

It’s a thought that we can take hope and courage in.

The Lukewarm Church – Laodicea

We have reached our final destination in our journey through the seven churches – the church of Laodicea. Please take some time to read Revelation 3:14-22 so you can follow along.

We immediately notice that Laodicea is the only church to receive absolutely no praise or commendation. Jesus does not waste time with flattery or undeserved praise:

I know all the things you do, that you are neither hot nor cold. I wish that you were one or the other! But since you are like lukewarm water, neither hot nor cold, I will spit you out of my mouth! You say, ‘I am rich. I have everything I want. I don’t need a thing!’ And you don’t realize that you are wretched and miserable and poor and blind and naked. (Revelation 3:15-17, NLT)

Wow. Christ’s words are not minced are they? Smugly self-satisfied, the Laodiceans have lulled themselves into a death spell. This is not just an apathetic church; this is an arrogant church. It’s a church that prides itself in its own spiritual “wealth” of knowledge and its own garments of righteousness. There is not a more dangerous place for a church to be than this state of arrogant indifference! Jesus pleads with the church to recognize their true state of wretched need. Jesus then invites all to come to Himself! He is the ultimate source of everything the church needs for victory:

So I advise you to buy gold from me—gold that has been purified by fire. Then you will be rich. Also buy white garments from me so you will not be shamed by your nakedness, and ointment for your eyes so you will be able to see. I correct and discipline everyone I love. (Revelation 3:18-19, NLT)

The pure gold offered by Christ represents the truth and faith which our spiritual walk is established on. He gives His garments of righteousness which transform our character into His spotless image. And then, there’s the eye salve. With His healing eye salve, we will be able to see ourselves as we really are – sinful and in desperate need of a Savior! But most importantly, we will have sight with which to clearly see Jesus Christ, and it is by looking into His wonderful face, “that the things on earth will grow strangely dim in the light of His glory and grace.” By beholding Him, we become transformed from the inside out!

 But we all, with unveiled face, beholding as in a mirror the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from glory to glory, just as by the Spirit of the Lord. (2 Corinthians 3:18, NKJV)

In Revelation 3 verse 20, we find one of the most amazing invitations in Scripture: “Look! I stand at the door and knock. If you hear my voice and open the door, I will come in, and we will share a meal together as friends” (NLT). As I was growing up, my mom kept this picture in one of our family rooms. It made an impression on me from a young age.

BeholdIStandAtTheDoorI love how this picture illustrates the Savior knocking gently and softly calling, “Hello? Is anyone home?” Also notice another small detail: there is no knob or handle on the outside of the door… The door can only be opened from the inside. This is the door to our hearts and Jesus cannot – He will not! – force His way in. We alone must make the choice to welcome Him.

I cannot think of a more appropriate way to conclude our study on the seven churches. Jesus stands at the door and knocks. We’ve spent the first chapters of Revelation getting to know what He’s like and what He’s all about. Now, as we face the subsequent chapters of Revelation and the sobering future that they unveil, we have a choice to make… Will we let Him in? Will we let Jesus be our Guide and Companion through as we journey through these last days of human history?

The Corrupt Church – Thyatira

It’s been a blessing to be able to study through the letters to the seven churches with you! This week, we explore Revelation 2:18-29 – Jesus’ words to the fourth church of Thyatira, a church that we often refer to as “the corrupt church.” Despite its problems, however, most of the members of the body are sincere believers. Jesus first begins by commending this group for its effective works of ministry: “I have seen your love, your faith, your service, and your patient endurance. And I can see your constant improvement in all these things” (Revelation 2:19, NLT). Notice how these concepts are related to each other:

Love leads to service; faith leads to perseverance. If you love God, you will serve his people. You cannot help it. It is the sign that you love that you are willing to serve. And if you have faith you will persevere; you will understand that God is in control and things will work out according to his purpose. (Ray Stedman. “Thyatira: The Worldly Church”)

If only the testimony to Thyatira stopped there! “But I have this complaint against you. You are permitting that woman–that Jezebel who calls herself a prophet–to lead my servants astray. She teaches them to commit sexual sin and to eat food offered to idols” (v. 20, NLT). Our first question is, of course: Who is Jezebel? We understand that this was not a literal person in the church, but rather a symbolic figure referring to a spirit of heretical teaching. Jezebel was, of course, the evil queen of the Old Testament who forced pagan Baal worship on the Israelite nation and who massacred God’s true prophets. So, notice the progression that we have seen over the last few churches: In the first church, Jesus applauds the Ephesians for “hating” the deeds of the Nicolaitans. The third church of Pergamum, however, has begun to “tolerate” some who “hold” the doctrine of the Nicolaitans and Balaam. Finally, Thyatira “allows” this Jezebel to openly “teach” God’s followers to abandon themselves to sexual sin and idolatry! The Jezebel heresy is the worst of all.

But what did this influence actually look like? Was it as blatant and obvious as a church teacher plopping down an idol in front of the congregation and telling them to worship it? What we have to understand is business in the city of Thyatira was conducted through a confederation of trade guilds or unions. If you wanted to do business in the city, you were supposed to be a part of one of these guilds and attend their meetings. These meetings were often held in one of the pagan temples and consisted of sacrificing meat to idols and participating in drunken orgies. This quote sheds more light on the situation:

So [Christians] had to make a choice. It was difficult to live in Thyatira for this very reason. But apparently Jezebel had begun to teach that it was all right for them to go along with the requirements of the guild, that they needed to submit to the pressures of the world around in order to make a living, and that God would understand and overlook this. Her philosophy was what you often hear today: “Business is business.” If business practices collide with your Christian principles, then your principles have to go — because you have to make a living. Have you ever heard that argument? (Ray Stedman. “Thyatira: The Worldly Church”)

Jesus closes his letter by once again encouraging the members of the church who have not been fooled by this trap: “I will ask nothing more of you except that you hold tightly to what you have until I come. To all who are victorious, who obey me to the very end… They will have the same authority I received from my Father, and I will also give them the morning star!” (vs. 24-28, NLT). I love how Jesus promises to give the overcomer the “morning star.” From Revelation 22:16, we know that Christ is the Bright and Morning Star. Jesus is promising to give us nothing less than Himself!

With a promise like that, I think we are all encouraged to continue to “hold tightly” to what we have in Jesus! That is our surest protection.

The Compromising Church – Pergamum

This week, we arrive at the third church of Pergamum. We can read Christ’s letter to this church in Revelation 2:12-17. Jesus’ first words are abrupt and startling: “I know your works, and where you dwell, where Satan’s throne is” (Rev. 2:13). Satan’s throne!? What does that mean? Interestingly enough, the city of Pergamum was one of the most concentrated centers of idolatry and pagan religion in the ancient Roman world. The city housed temples for Dionysus and Zeus, as well as the very first temple dedicated to the cult of Roman emperor worship. Sources even suggest that Pergamum can be identified as the seat of Babylonian sun worship. No wonder Jesus refers to Pergamum as the city where Satan’s throne is! The fact that the church has maintained its identity amidst its evil surroundings is something that Jesus affirms them for. However, Jesus’ next words ought to make us sit up straight and pay attention: “But I have a few things against you…”

Here, we find a radical shift in the spiritual condition of Pergamum as compared to the previous two churches. The days of persecution are a thing of the past for the church of Pergamum. Now, the church finds itself safe and comfortable – too comfortable… Compromise has begun to creep in. The Nicolaitans were not tolerated in the first church of Ephesus, but here in Pergamum they spread their heresy within church walls! On top of that, Jesus rebukes the church for allowing the “doctrine of Balaam” to infiltrate the congregation. We, of course, all know the story of Balaam and the donkey and his attempt to curse the children of Israel for a bribe. When that plot wasn’t successful, Balaam had a new idea. “Instead of cursing the children of Israel from the outside, why don’t we get them to compromise and disobey God’s commandments on the inside? That way, they’ll simply bring the curse upon themselves!” Balaam’s new strategy was tragically successful. His tactics were to get the Israelites to compromise in the areas of idolatry and sexual immorality. Ironically, these were the same sins that the Nicolaitans were known for. The ancient doctrine of Balaam and the new teachings of the Nicolaitans were simply two sides of the same coin.

At this point, we may find ourselves sighing with relief. At least we don’t have to worry about those pesky Balaamites and Nicolaitans today! Good thing we don’t have to worry about eating foods sacrificed to idols anymore… But, let’s not jump ahead so fast. The heresy of the Balaamites/Nicolaitans was much more sophisticated than it sounds. We have to remember the cultural setting of the day. The temples were not only the religious centers of the community, but the social centers as well. The pagan temples hosted important social events and community gatherings. If you wanted to “fit in,” you had to attend these temple feasts where meat was publicly sacrificed to the gods and then consumed as a part of the worship ritual. And then, as the night would wear on… with temple male and female prostitutes at every turn, the temptation to compromise sexually was virtually inevitable. This kind of compromise was exactly what Paul warned against in 1 Corinthians 8:9-13 and 10:14-33. Paul was deeply concerned that “stronger” Christians were attending these kinds of events and partaking of these meat sacrifices because they felt “free in Christ” to do anything they wanted. But through their participation, they were actually compromising their own spiritual integrity and causing newer, “weaker” Christians to stumble. This so-called “freedom” to “do whatever you want” because it “seems all right” and “feels okay” was the real heresy of Balaamites and Nicolaitans.

You say, “I am allowed to do anything”–but not everything is good for you. You say, “I am allowed to do anything”–but not everything is beneficial. Don’t be concerned for your own good but for the good of others. (1 Corinthians 10:23-24, NLT)

As I turn this around on myself and attempt to apply these lessons to my own life, I have no other choice but to confront myself with the difficult questions: Is there anything in my life that might be a stumbling block for others? Perhaps in some of my social interactions? Maybe some of my entertainment choices? I don’t want to make the same mistake that Pergamum did, and I don’t believe you do either.

In closing, I would like to offer these questions for personal reflection:

  • How does Christ identify Himself to the church of Pergamum in verse 12? How is that identifying characteristic significant in light of the issue which Pergamum is struggling with?
  • Why is it sometimes easier to hold on to “socially acceptable” sins in our lives? What is Jesus’ solution for this problem?
  • What do you think the significance is to the hidden manna and white stone which Christ promises to those who overcome? Why do you think we will be given a new name?

The Persecuted Church – Smyrna

I hope you will enjoy these devotional thoughts from this week’s study of the “persecuted church” in Revelation 2:8-11.

“Write this letter to the angel of the church in Smyrna. This is the message from the one who is the First and the Last, who was dead but is now alive” (v. 8). I think it’s interesting that before saying anything else in this passage, Jesus first introduces Himself to the suffering congregation by highlighting two aspects of His character and power: First of all, Christ identifies Himself as “the First and the Last.” Let that sink in for a little bit… Jesus is in control of the endless reaches of the universe and the eternal expanse of time, and He is also the “author and finisher of our faith” (Hebrews 12:2). He is in control of the beginning and ending of our stories too – as well as everything in between!

Christ is also the One “who died and came to life.” The church of Smyrna would have found special significance in these words. Think about it, here we have a little flock of believers bound for death. Jesus warns that some of them will soon be cast into prison, and some will even face the martyr’s sword. (Even the name “Smyrna” is connected with the word “myrrh,” the balm of death.) But, because He conquered death, Jesus has the power and authority to promise, “Be faithful unto death, and I will give you the crown of life” (v. 10). The word here for “crown” is stephanos. Rather than a crown of royalty, this is a crown of victory – the kind a champion might receive in the games for which the city of Smyrna was so famous. Tragically, some of the church’s Christians would soon be dragged into the center of these game arenas to be devoured by beasts and slaughtered by gladiators, all to the glee of the screaming spectators. Yet, it is to these faithful sufferers that Jesus promises the crown of victory, the crown of life!

I think it’s also interesting that Jesus has no words of rebuke for the church of Smyrna. Why is that? It seems that because this is a persecuted church, Christ only offers words of encouragement and comfort. There is something about persecution that makes us get our priorities straight, isn’t there? When churches suffer persecution, all of the sudden we don’t see congregations splitting over the color of the carpet, do we? All of the petty arguments over the fluff simply disappear. The season of testing also produces faith and endurance (James 1:2-3). And as the external pressure from the outside increases, the church community grows tightly together as a family. The bonds of fellowship become life-line support systems for each member. That’s when the onlooking world gets to see first-hand how the family of is supposed to act and love. “By this all people will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another” (John 13:35, ESV).

In spite of the coming onslaught of persecution, however, Christ is also clear on what the church’s attitude should be as they await their fate: “Do not fear what you are about to suffer” (v. 10). I like how The Message puts it: “Fear nothing in the things you’re about to suffer–but stay on guard! Fear nothing! The Devil is about to throw you in jail for a time of testing–ten days. It won’t last forever.” In the Jewish mindset, ten days symbolized a season of testing or trial. (See Daniel 1:12, for example.) Jesus is encouraging the church that their suffering will only be temporary.

We know that the great Christian martyr Polycarp was actually from Smyrna. Around 155 A.D. Polycarp is recorded as saying on the day of his execution, “Eighty and six years I have served Him, and He has done me no wrong… How then can I blaspheme my King and Saviour? Bring forth what thou wilt.” He was then burned at the stake for refusing to burn incense to the Roman Emperor. That’s a bold faith! I often look at that kind of faith and worry that I would simply never be brave enough. And, of course, the reality is that I won’t ever be–and neither will you. But, if we put our faith not in ourselves but in the One who conquered death and the One who is the Beginning and Ending of our stories, then there is no way we can possibly fail. We are guaranteed the crown of victory!